Ingeniero White 2 – Museo Ferrowhite

After Yesterdays trip I returned to Ingeniero White and this time I was able to visit Museo Ferrowhite.

I arrived early at the morning.
The building is amazing, it used to be a power plant (Usina General San Martín). Most of the museum is on what was the workshop.
There’s a bit more of history at http://ferrowhite.bahiablanca.gov.ar/ , http://ferrowhite.bahiablanca.gov.ar/afuera.htm and http://ferrowhite.bahiablanca.gov.ar/museo.htm

We were only three, a couple of girls from Brazil and me. The guides gave us a very warm welcome and invited us to help setting up a workshop for the local kids. As we walked the gardens they started to narrate the history of the place and we chit chatted about ours.

After organizing the tables, chairs and materials we returned to the main building. The private tour was very nice and at a slow pace, giving us time to ask lots of questions and to observe as we pleased.

Some of the tooling was on display, part of it was from the power plant, the rest from the trains and dockyards. Among other things there was a bandsaw made entirely of wood save for a couple of things and really big lathes.

On the background of the third picture, a bit over exposed, there’s an exhibition mounted on tracks. Each one is a prop representing historical events. Behind them there’s an assortment of levers and chains, while one guide explains the other cranks a wheel to turn them into life. They were a bit rusty and we ended up panting after that part.

On an elevated set of rooms there’s a display of material related to a technical / trade school. Mostly about trains, signaling devices and part of general mechanic education.

Back on the main level there’s a room that simulates part of an old train station, complete with benches and a ticket office.
There’s also a very antique phone booth. You can get inside, the phone rings and upon picking up you get to hear some historical speeches.

As we were only three the guides gave us an exclusive tour of the storage room where they keep everything not in display.
I was able to see things I never expected to in real life, lots of antique radios and naval equipment, many Atwater Kent and even a record cutting lathe!

After the tour I walked a bit around the dock and some abandoned buildings then I went back to the city hoping to find that stash of old documents but they were gone.

I toyed again with the steam locomotive and a light fixture, then I went back to the hostel.

Also, this flyer reminds me a lot to Romantically Apocalyptic:

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