Scope

We have this old scope for the students. It’s been unused for a while as it behaved erratically and then stopped working completely.

After setting the trigger to a more or less sane value I had something on the screen but the controls where flaky. A heavy dose of our deoxit equivalent and twisting it sprang to life. I adjusted the dc offset (drifts a bit while warming up) and matched the channel gains as much as I could and called it a day.

Fixing a Hitachi V212 oscilloscope

Grandpa’s 504: The beginnings

During the last week I began to clean and dismantle the engine of that Peugeot 504 using whatever spare time I had.

I started by removing the battery plate, water and vacuum reservoirs and the hoses connecting them. I took a couple of detailed pictures so I don’t forget how to put it back together later.

I spent a while trying to figure out how to remove the radiator, it’s bolted to the car frame and there’s a plastic cover around the fan blades that doesn’t let it move up. The most obvious way seemed to remove the front grill and the body panel behind it but in order to do that I would have to tear apart the original glue and make a couple of cuts. I kept looking and feeling around until I discovered that the air guide is only held by two nuts on the top and locking pins on the bottom.

After removing them, it glided freely upwards and then to the back. With nothing else holding it, the radiator also came out.

That freed up some space in the engine bay. I moved on to the belts. This is a very good time to take note of how everything is installed.

Then I moved onto the hoses. Some were hard and brittle and others felt like new. But all were filled with rusty mud.

The water pump was no better, the impeller stayed inside the block.

The radiator has a lovely copper corrosion growth. After draining it I poured hot water on one side and let it flow, touching along the fins to see if there were clogs. Except for a small hand sized area on the bottom everything seemed fine.

First run in 20 years.

Today I bought a used battery and decided to crank this old Peugeot 504 to see if the engine was seized or other problems lurked.

It’s been sitting there since 1998 but the diesel in the tank did not smell funny so I used the little pump on the filter until it became hard. On the last strokes I heard a subtle noise and there was a tiny leak on the line.

When connecting the battery there was a small spark and the position lights turned on. I let the glow plugs do their job and tried to crank.

Nothing, just a small click of a relay inside the dash. After a couple of times it turned with some effort but refused to start.

I let the battery rest for a moment and tried again. This time it roared as I pressed the accelerator, puffed some smoke and then idled calmly. I can hardly believe it awoke from a two decade slumber just like that.

Now I have to fix the water circuit (the hoses are dry and crumbling) and the clutch so I can move it around with a bit of ease.

Bicycle pulling a car.

This happened today:

That’s a 1981 Peugeot 504 (diesel) that belonged to my grandfather. After his death about 20 years ago it’s been sitting first on the original garage and lately inside this shed that we are fixing up.

The tires have an inner tube as it was usual on that era and that’s an advantage, I doubt that any contemporary tubeless would still be sealed after spending so long being flat.

I had a bit of space to speed up while pushing and the front wheels went by with relative ease. However, there’s a small step and I couldn’t make it go further with the initial momentum alone.

I lifted the car with a jack and made a small ramp out of bricks and a slab of wood. I carefully released the jack and the car slowly moved on its own. The underside looks quite good for a machine of that vintage.

Reduce, Reuse Recycle summary December 2017 – January 2018

(Sounds nicer than saying dumpster diving eh?)

We can learn a lot about a society just from looking what we throw away (see Garbology).

When I lived in Berisso it was really odd to see on the curb something that worked or was fixable.

Here in La Plata and without even trying I stumble upon stuff that is just a little bit broken if not working (albeit a tad old).

This last two months among other things I picked up with my bike basket:

  • A vacuum cleaner, complete with hoses. Only needed a carbon brush replacement.
  • Home audio amplifier. The cd tray is stuck but we feed it from the line in. A bit heavy but very nice sound.
  • Mantle top fan. Works fine as a fan but the pivoting mechanism is acting up. Just needed a thorough cleaning.
  • Leather briefcase. Sold in less than a day as a theater prop.
  • Wooden wine rack. Works fine for other beverages too.

This is not exactly dumpster diving but I also helped the widow of a neighbor silent key to clean up his shop.
Out of the deal I got:

  • Two 100Mbps rackable switches. They work but at that speed I only want them for the chassis and supplies
  • An antique lamp. Already restoring it.
  • A Commodore 1541 dirve and some original CompuServe disks. On their way to a museum.
  • A very old (when telegraphs were the norm) glass insulator and threaded pole made of hardwood. Has the right volume to make a shot glass.
  • A modern medium voltage insulator. It’s quite heavy but in nice condition. I’ll probably make a lamp out of it.
  • Lots of heatsinks and coolers.
  • Old cans of candy and medicines. They don’t have a high monetary value but are collectible and can be traded for something else.

Torno Lorch Schmidt

Hace unos días me traje a casa un torno de relojero que perteneció a mi abuelo (entre muchas otras profesiones fué relojero). Tengo que volver a buscar los contrapuntos y el plato divisor pero dentro de todo está bastante completo. Mas fotos después del salto.

 

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Detallista.

Original en Chino ( traducido al inglés acá ).

La última vez que se me cayó la baba de semejante forma con un aparato electrónico fue cuando intenté (sin éxito) de reparar el equipo de rayos x en el cig. Releyendo mails viejos me encontré con el reloj de este señorito. Tiene todo para dejarme medio bobo por un buen rato. Es un reloj, tiene tubos nixie (no de los mas interesantes pero tubos al fin), y el diseño es exquisito pero sin descuidar la funcionalidad. Hasta me gustan los led en las bases, algo que siempre desprecié.

 

Transformador de aislación II

Ya casi lo termino… (vine de acá). En la semana terminé la madera del tope y emprolijé las derivaciones. Ahora me falta nada más ponerle un portalámparas para la serie.

Shorpy

Anoche mientras buscaba fotos de equipos antiguos de radio para redecorar un poco caí en Shorpy. Es un sitio para compartir fotos “vintage”. Gran parte de las fotos que me gustaron también están en la Library Of Congress, con el agregado de que varias de ellas también fueron coloreadas por miembros del sitio. Por ejemplo esta de Mary Loomis, la primer mujer en dirigir una escuela para radioaficionados.

This colorized image shows Mary Texanna Loomis, the first woman in the U.S. to run a radio school, operating her radio station in 1921. Her school, the Loomis Radio College, operated in Washington, D.C., in the 1920's and 1930's. She is seated at an early receiver that uses a panel mounted crystal detector. The knife switches to the right are probably antenna selectors. Next to that is an antenna tuner called a "loose coupler", which is connected to a tube receiver out of view on the right.

This colorized image shows Mary Texanna Loomis, the first woman in the U.S. to run a radio school, operating her radio station in 1921. Her school, the Loomis Radio College, operated in Washington, D.C., in the 1920's and 1930's. She is seated at an early receiver that uses a panel mounted crystal detector. The knife switches to the right are probably antenna selectors. Next to that is an antenna tuner called a "loose coupler", which is connected to a tube receiver out of view on the right.

Buena nueva.

En el 2011 voy a poder visitar Ucrania! Acabo de leer en el Washington Post que van a abrir la zona de exclusión. Trenes, paisajes hermosos, equipamiento militar en desuso (y no tanto)… Esto es mejor que todos los hospitales abandonados.